Sawdust

定価:
マーケットプレイス価格:¥ 749 (税込)

レーベル:Island
カテゴリ:CD
:3380348
JAN:0602517495753
Amazon.co.jp 売上ランキング:音楽で387357位

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トラックリスト
  1. Tranquilize
  2. Shadowplay
  3. All The Pretty Faces
  4. Leave The Bourbon On The Shelf
  5. Sweet Talk
  6. Under The Gun
  7. Where The White Boys Dance
  8. Show You How
  9. Move Away
  10. Glamorous Indie Rock and Roll
  11. Who Let You Go?
  12. The Ballad of Michael Valentine
  13. Ruby, Don't Take Your Love To Town
  14. Daddy's Eyes
  15. Sam's Town (Abbey Road Version)
  16. Romeo and Juliet
  17. Mr. Brightside (Jacques Lu Cont's Thin White Duke Remix)
エディターレビュー
With only two studio releases behind them, it might surprise some to hear that the Killers had enough material to release a b-sides and rarities CD only five years after forming, but this is definitely no all-filler/no-killer collection, instead containing a mittful of legitimately strong and worthwhile songs. There are four never-before-released Killer songs on Sawdust, including "Tranquilize," featuring rock legend Lou Reed on half of the vocals, a number that is filled with a Queen-affected operatic touch. The previously unreleased "Shadowplay"--a Joy Division cover--unfortunately pales compared to the original, while "Leave Your Bourbon at the Door" is easily the summit of the CD; a longtime live favorite, the song's despair and urgency is a must-have for any Killer fan. Also noteworthy is an outtake from the Hot Fuss sessions called "Under the Gun," a driving melody with a memorable chorus that feels like a Killers classic. Lesser-known tracks gathered together on this compilation include "Move Away"--first heard on the Spiderman 3 soundtrack--which is straight-up U2-circa-Vertigo era, but still exciting to listen to. Some previously released b-sides are cover tunes that provide musical whimsy, but not much more: the trad-country "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town," which was made famous by Kenny Rogers, while the impassioned "Romeo and Juliet" tune--written by Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits fame--is nearly mimicked by Flowers, and serves little more purpose than providing homage to a wonderfully written melody and tale. --Denise Sheppard
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